Muslim restaurant to feed homeless free on Christmas Day!

10 12 2016

Story highlights

  • More than 25 residents will volunteer their time
  • “It’s not about religion,” one of the managers said

London (CNN)A Muslim-owned Turkish restaurant is offering a free three-course meal to the homeless and elderly on December 25, because no one should eat alone on Christmas Day.

The gesture stemmed from a chance encounter with a woman who needed help closing her window.
The restaurant, Shish, is located on the outskirts of London. Early last month, an elderly woman who lived in the neighborhood came in to the restaurant and asked if anyone could help pull down a window she was having difficulty reaching.
The staff didn’t hesitate. And when the woman returned the next day to thank them, she told them how she’d be alone for Christmas.
Her situation reminded owner Serdar Kigili of his mother in Turkey, whom he hadn’t seen in five years. The management team then came up with the plan.
The team first advertised on the restaurant’s front window with a hand-written note: “No one eats alone on a Christmas Day! We are here to sit with you. 3 course meal for the homeless from 12-6pm. Any homeless or elderly are welcomed.”
The post has now been shared more than 1,000 times on the restaurant’s Facebook page.
It inspired more than 25 residents to volunteer their time helping out that day. And a group of taxi drivers in the area have also said they will shuttle the elderly and homeless to and from the restaurant for free.
“It’s not about religion, language or culture. It’s about community,” one of the managers, Irfan Can Genc, told CNN.
The approximately 66-seat space will be open all day, serving starters of soup and cacik, a yoghurt-based dip and mains of chicken, vegetarian casserole or chicken shish. Traditional rice pudding will be offered as dessert.
Genc says that he hopes the store will set an example for the community and that other restaurants might grab hold of the holiday spirit of giving
By Kara Fox, CNN




Grandson tweets about Grandma’s google search goes viral

16 06 2016

May Ashworth, 86, and her grandson Ben.

Story highlights

  • Grandmother Googles an unusual request
  • Grandson tweets about it, goes viral

London (CNN)Step aside, cute baby videos — there’s now a special funny place on the internet for the less tech-savvy. Like these grandparents working out how awebcam works. Or all of these grandparents figuring out Facebook.

The newest member of this club is a British nan whose politeness has turned her into a viral sensation after she Googled an unusual request. Her grandson Ben tweeted it for the enjoyment of all:
“Please translate these roman numerals mcmxcviii thank you,” Liverpool-born May Ashworth, 86, asked Google.
Ben, 26, told CNN that he thinks the current hype around the photo is “utterly mad! The fact it’s gone all around the globe is crazy! But it seems to be making people happy which is great.”
“After the absolute atrocity in Orlando people need a reason to smile.”
His tweet has been retweeted more than 16,000 times, and the replies are brilliant:
Oh, and she did get the answer to her question after all, straight from Google.
And this is the two of them together:
It turns out, the internet isn’t such a bad place after all.




Making Up by Kindness

3 04 2014

Making Up by Kindness

With my inexperience, I changed the flat tire in something under an hour and rolled into the nearest petrol station to see if the old spare was still useable. The attendant whom I had never seen before put a patch on the tube. When I said “How much?” he waved me off. “It’s on the house,” he said.
“It’s very kind of you, but why are you doing this for a stranger I asked curiously.
“Well,” he said, “yesterday I woke up as mean as a beaver with a toothache, I bit everybody who came in sight. This morning I feel fine. So, today I’m making up for yesterday. Favors for the customers, kind words for the help. That’s how I pay off for the bad days.”
Make up your offenses against God with many acts of kindness this lent.





A Stranger Was Daddy To My Child By Shanell Mouland

22 01 2014

A Stranger Was Daddy To My Child By Shanell Mouland

Dear “Daddy,”
I don’t know your name, but Kate called you “daddy” for the entire flight last week and you kindly never corrected her. In fact, you didn’t even flinch as you could probably tell that she was not confusing you with her own “daddy,” but instead making a judgment regarding your level of “safety” for her. If she calls you “daddy” then you better believe she thinks you are alright.

I sat Kate, my 3-year-old who has autism, in the middle seat knowing full well that there would be a stranger sitting next to her for the duration of this flight. I had to make a quick decision and based on her obsession with opening and closing the window shade, I figured she might be less of a distraction if she sat in the middle. I watched the entire Temple basketball team board the plane, and wondered if one of these giants might sit by Kate. They all moved toward the back. She would have liked that, she would have made some observations that I would have had to deal with, but she would have liked those players. I watched many Grandmotherly women board and hoped for one to take the seat but they walked on by. For a fleeting moment I thought we might have a free seat beside us, and then you walked up and sat down with your briefcase and your important documents and I had a vision of Kate pouring her water all over your multi-million dollar contracts, or house deeds, or whatever it was you held. The moment you sat down, Kate started to rub your arm. Your jacket was soft and she liked the feel of it. You smiled at her and she said: “Hi, Daddy, that’s my mom.” Then she had you.

You could have shifted uncomfortably in your seat. You could have ignored her. You could have given me that “smile” that I despise because it means; “manage your child please.” You did none of that. You engaged Kate in conversation and you asked her questions about her turtles. She could never really answer your questions but she was so enamored with you that she kept eye contact and joint attention on the items you were asking her about. I watched and smiled. I made a few polite offers to distract her, but you would have none of it.
Kate: (Upon noticing you had an iPad) Is dis Daddy’s puduter?
You: This is my iPad. Would you like to see it?
Kate: To me?????? (I know she thought you were offering it to her to keep)
Me: Look with your eyes, Kate. That is not yours.
Kate: Dat’s nice!
You: (Upon noticing that Kate had an iPad) I like your computer, too. It has a nice purple case.
Kate: Daddy wanna be a bad guy? (She offered shredder to you and that, my friend, is high praise)
You: Cool.
The interaction went on and on and you never once seemed annoyed. She gave you some moments of peace while she played with her Anna and Elsa dolls. Kind of her to save you from playing Barbies, but I bet you wouldn’t have minded a bit. I bet you have little girls, too.
Not long before we landed Kate had reached her limit. She screamed to have her seatbelt off, she screamed for me to open the plane door and she cried repeating, “Plane is cwosed (closed)” over and over. You tried to redirect her attention to her toys. She was already too far gone at this point, but the fact that you tried to help your new little friend made me emotional.
In case you are wondering, she was fine the moment we stepped off the plane. Thank you for letting us go ahead of you. She was feeling overwhelmed and escaping the plane and a big, long hug was all she needed.
So, thank you. Thank you for not making me repeat those awful apologetic sentences that I so often say in public. Thank you for entertaining Kate so much that she had her most successful plane ride, yet. And, thank you for putting your papers away and playing turtles with our girl.








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