At last the world agrees that a baby is a baby says a broken hearted man

23 07 2013

At last the world agrees that a baby is a child, says a broken hearted man

Kate Middleton, gave birth to a baby boy and the entire world is rejoicing. Yet there is a man who is not rejoicing, his name is Martin. Here he tells his story:
“My girlfriend was less than 20 weeks pregnant… by a few days. The Sonogram showed two little babies, with fingers and hands and feet and faces and heartbeats; alive and waiting to be born. Yet, late one night, when we were talking and she said, “I’m not ready to be a mother.”
I told her that nobody is. She said, “I’m scared.”
I told her that every mother is scared. Although she wasn’t enrolled in college at the time, she wanted to go. I was enrolled in a Bachelor’s Program and was working toward my degree. She said, “But I want to finish college and do something with my life.”
I told her that I would help with the baby and somehow we’d both finish college. “It might be harder. We may have to make some sacrifices but we’ll get through it.”
She said that she was going to college and I could stay home and watch the baby. I was working for Lockheed Martin at the time and a condition of my employment was that I had to be enrolled in a Bachelor’s Program. So we disagreed on who was going to finish college first. The fear and the anxiety and the uncertainty led to a small disagreement that ended with us going to bed not talking. She faced one way. I faced the other.

Next morning I got up and was getting ready to go to work. I thought everything was going to be fine. We made it through the storm. She came downstairs and said, “I’m going through with it.”
“What?”
She said, “I’ve made up my mind. I’m going through with it.”
She asked me to drive her to the clinic. I tried to reason with her. She wasn’t having it. I refused to take her. She called a cab. I thought to myself, “If I let her get in that cab, she’ll surely go through with it.”
So I agreed to take her to Planned Parenthood in hopes of talking her out of it. She wasn’t having any of that. I tried to talk. She was silent. Not a word. I drove. She stared out the window. She was stubborn. She was a “modern woman”, nobody was going to tell her what to do… Not me… Not God… Nobody.

So we got to Planned Parenthood and I pulled into the parking lot and parked as close as I could to the protesters. She was unfazed. I walked with her through the small group of protesters. I took a pamphlet and tried to give it to her. She was determined. I said, “Look those are fingers. That’s a head. They were alive. Our babies are alive.”
She was walking briskly… She pretended she didn’t hear me. We got to the security gate of Planned Parenthood and rang the doorbell. A woman came out and unlocked the gate and then locked it behind us. We went into the lobby of the building. I grabbed my girlfriend’s hand, “Don’t do this.”
She tried to pull her hand back and said, “I’m not ready to be a mother.”
“Please, don’t do this. Reconsider” The lady who escorted us in told her the clinic was on the second floor. “Please, We can get through this. Don’t kill our babies.” She pulled her hand back, turned away from me and went up toward the clinic.

I was defeated. I left the clinic and got in my car and drove way too fast down the street. I ran a couple of red lights. I was so scared and angry and hurt and lost and all the emotions like a broken damn came flooding through me. I wanted to scream. I was helpless to protect my babies. I was completely unable to do a single thing to protect them. Where were my rights? Where were the rights of those two beautiful babies? What in the hell did rights have to do with murder? Nobody has the right to murder!!! All of these thoughts flooded my emotions like a freight train… with each box car a thought… And it was going 500 miles per hour through my head. And then…. like an explosion… A tragic horrific wreck… A screeching scraping explosion of thought…

Everything went high pitch… And then went silent….

The moment my children were murdered, a ripple, a shockwave went through my body. Though I wasn’t there… I felt it. I knew something terrible had just happened in that moment. She felt it too.

I turned around and drove as fast as I could back to that clinic. I parked my car in the middle of the road in front of the clinic, nearly on top of the protesters. I rang the doorbell by the gate. I rang it again… and again… Finally the same lady came out. She let me in… She said, “You can’t leave your car there, the police will have it towed.”
“They can have it, please open the door, let me in.” She opened the door. I ran to the top of the stairs. Up to the clinic. I ran through the doors. I went up to the little window. I asked where my girlfriend was… “She’s in recovery.”
My heart sank, “Can I see her?”
“Let me check,” the nurse said. A few agonizingly long minutes later she returned and escorted me to the recovery room.
My girlfriend was crying. She said, “I was wrong. I felt them when they died. They pulled my heart out with our babies.”
I cried. She cried. She said, “Oh God, what have I done? I feel horrible, empty… I feel barren… Like a dead flower”
I cried. She cried. I stayed with her for a few minutes but needed some air. I went down and moved my illegally parked car. I parked away from the protesters in the parking lot. Then went back up. When they finally let her leave… We cried. We walked past the protesters. She could barely stand. She cried the whole way home. “Why didn’t I listen?”
“What was I thinking?” And on and on and on… The emotional pain was unbearable.

She was expressing her “legal rights”. She was expressing her “Womanly Rights”. She was a “modern woman”. Her life was about her. Not about the inconvenience of the “fertilized eggs” that were inside her. They weren’t babies yet. But it’s hard to keep my heart from breaking up each time I hear in the news that Kate Middleton, the Duchess of Cambridge, was carrying a baby. That’s right, a child, not a “a fertilized egg” as my children were. At last, a child is a child.
Those who support the legal killing of unborn human beings in the womb have used political language for decades, cloaking their morally indefensible position in innocuous-sounding terms.
Some say it is the men who want their partners to have abortions; they neglect many man who desperately want their children. These men may beg and plead, may fight for their children’s lives – but in the end. We have no say
…Martin

Thanks to LiveAction for this story





The Inquisitive Little Boy

19 06 2013

The Inquisitive Little Boy

During the great Exhibition in London, a gentle man went his little boy.
The child was astonished at the things he saw, and was anxious to know why they were made. His father answered him , and described the use of the various things as they passed along.

You see, my dear boy,” said the father to him, ” everything here has been made for a certain purpose. You also were made by God for a certain purpose.”

“For what purpose did God make me, Father?” the boy asked, excited.

“God made you to know Him, love Him, and serve Him in this world, and be happy with Him in the next, my boy. Keep these words always in your mind,  and try every day to learn something about your Father in Heaven.”





Why aren’t I fucked up? I had really good parents: Harry Porter

10 06 2013

Why aren’t I fucked up? I had really good parents: Harry Porter

I hope all parents are listening. Daniel Radcliffe, star of Harry potter franchise, has highlighted the overriding importance of good upbringing. Parents play a very important role in molding the character of their children. Many addicts and freaks could have turned out better if only they had really good parents. In interview with Time Out London this week, he revealed that he would like to father a child before turning 30.

“I really want to have kids. I’ve grown up around lots of people who were having kids when I knew them, because a lot of them were a lot older than me. And I saw the wonderful change in them. A lot more tired, a lot more happy,” said the 23-year-old actor.

He’s got big aspirations for his future offspring too. “I’m definitely going to be one of those parents who pushes their kids into things,” he says, adding, “I’d love my kids to be a boxer. Yeah! Cricket too.” But the 5′ 5″ actor quipped that he will have to find “a VERY tall wife” to ensure that any kids he has are good at sports.

While he believes he’s too old to star as Harry Potter again, he says he would like to play the bespectacled boy’s dad. But that’s not his only career goal. Before hitting the big 3-0, Radcliffe also plans to direct a production and write a piece of work that he will be proud of. He’s also written his first screenplay.

For now, however, he’s sticking to acting. In The Cripple of Inishmaan, which debuts at the Noel Coward Theatre in London’s West End today, Radcliffe plays a bullied Irish country boy who tries to score a role in a Hollywood film being made on a nearby island.

He’s well prepared to play a victim of bullies, telling the Guardian that he “really enjoys stage violence,” which he first learned from stuntmen on the Harry Potter set. He says he later made a hobby out of choreographing fight scenes on his lunch breaks.

And the best question of all in the interview: When asked, “why aren’t you a completely fucked up egomanic?” despite becoming famous at age 11 and a multimillionaire by age 19, Radcliffe humbly replied, “I had really good parents.” Good answer

TIME





Suicide of Humanity: The Battle of Somme

4 06 2013

Suicide of Humanity: The Battle of Somme

“War is madness,” Pope Francis said on June 2. “It is the suicide of humanity.” This unusually strong language best applies to The Battle of the Somme started in July 1st 1916. It lasted until November 1916. For many people, the Battle of the Somme was the battle that symbolised the horrors of warfare in World War One; this one battle had a marked effect on overall casualty figures and seemed to epitomise the futility of trench warfare.
For many years those who led the British campaign have received a lot of criticism for the way the Battle of the Somme was fought – especially Douglas Haig. This criticism was based on the appalling casualty figures suffered by the British and the French. By the end of the battle, the British Army had suffered 420,000 casualties including nearly 60,000 on the first day alone. The French lost 200,000 men and the Germans nearly 500,000.

Ironically, going over the top at the Somme was the first taste of battle many of these men had, as many were part of “Kitchener’s Volunteer Army” persuaded to volunteer by posters showing Lord Kitchener himself summoning these men to arms to show their patriotism.

Why was the battle fought?

For a number of months the French had been taking severe losses at Verdun – to the east of Paris. To relieve the French, the Allied High Command decided to attack the Germans to the north of Verdun therefore requiring the Germans to move some of their men away from the Verdun battlefield thus relieving the French. After the war, Sir William Robertson, Chief of the Imperial General Staff, explained what this strategy was:

Remembering the dissatisfaction by ministers at the end of 1915, because the operations had not come up to their expectations, the General Staff took the precaution to make quite clear beforehand the nature of success which the Somme campaign might yield. The necessity of relieving pressure on the French Army at Verdun remains, and is more urgent than ever. This is, therefore, the first objective to be obtained by the combined British and French offensive. The second objective is to inflict as heavy losses as possible upon the German armies.

Ironically, the head of the French Army, General Foch, believed that the attack in the Somme would achieve little – this view was shared by some leading British commanders such as General Henry Rawlinson. However, orders from the army’s political masters in London and Paris ensured that the battle would take place.

Just how backward military thinking was then is shown by the fact that the British put a regiment of cavalry on standby when the attack started to exploit the hole that would be created by a devastating infantry attack. British military faith was still being placed on cavalry attacks in 1916 when the nature of war in the previous two years would have clearly indicated that cavalry was no longer viable. This shows how conservative military thinking was during this war.

The battle at the Somme started with a weeklong artillery bombardment of the German lines. 1,738,000 shells were fired at the Germans. The logic behind this was so that the artillery guns would destroy the German trenches and barbed wire placed in front of the trenches. The use of artillery was heavily supported by Field Marshall Haig:

The enemy’s position to be attacked was of a very considerable character, situated on high, undulating tract of ground. (They had) deep trenches….bomb proof shelters……wire entanglements forty yards broad often as thick as a man’s finger. Defences of this nature could only be attacked with the prospect of success after careful artillery preparation

In fact, the Germans had deep dugouts for their men and all they had to do when the bombardment started was to move these men into the relative safety of the deep dugouts. When the bombardment stopped, the Germans would have known that this would have been the signal for an infantry advance. They moved from the safety of their dugouts and manned their machine guns to face the British and French.

The British soldiers advanced across a 25-mile front.

By the end of the battle, in November 1916, the British had lost 420,000, the French lost nearly 200,000 men and the Germans 500,000. The Allied forces had advanced along a thirty-mile strip that was seven miles deep at its maximum.

Lord Kitchener was a supporter of the theory of attrition – that eventually you would grind down your enemy and they would have to yield. He saw the military success of the battle as all-important. However, it did have dire political and social consequences in Britain. Many spoke of the “lost generation”. Many people found it difficult to justify the near 88,000 Allied men lost for every one mile gained in the advance.

Article from http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/somme.htm

 








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